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South African old vines/Collin/WOSA: Maree Louw

Proof that old vines add value

Research from the University of Cape Town shows that using old vine fruit earns winemakers more money. This effort to quantify the gains, says Michael Fridjhon, will help keep these treasures alive.
 

South Africa’s wine industry faces collapse

South Africa’s ruling African National Congress party has slapped a ban on the domestic sale of alcohol. This, plus the loss of wine tourism, threatens to cripple the wine industry, says Michael Fridjhon.
 

For and against the clean wine trend

Cameron Diaz has just released a ‘clean’ wine and a debate has followed. Robert Joseph agrees with the critics. Up to a point.
 

How to get consumers to pay more for their wines

The expensive rosés now appearing on the market are following a time-honoured strategy. Robert Joseph explores the psychology of pricing.

As France’s wine industry contracts, an incalculable cultural loss

Every year, the number of French vineyards and wineries falls, as people retire or exit the business. Robert Joseph asks what can be done to reinvigorate the sector.
 

Schloss Johannisberg and the story of Riesling

Three hundred years ago this year, a far-sighted noble decided to plant a vineyard with just one grape – Riesling. It was a decision that changed wine history. Ilka Lindemann has the story.
 

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Proof that old vines add value

Research from the University of Cape Town shows that using old vine fruit earns winemakers more money. This effort to quantify the gains, says Michael Fridjhon, will help keep these treasures alive.
 

Why are wine bottles round in shape?

Think how much space and money could be saved if wine bottles were square instead of round, says Robert Joseph.

How to get consumers to pay more for their wines

The expensive rosés now appearing on the market are following a time-honoured strategy. Robert Joseph explores the psychology of pricing.

A very serious discussion about wine advertising

Wine advertising is lacking in humour, asks Robert Joseph. He thinks it’s time that marketers lightened up.