Italy: Surprisingly Large Harvest - Despite 'Drought of the Century'

A production of 50.27 mill. hl of wine expected in 2022 - Italy finishes 2022 with a slightly above-average yield.

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Italy harvested a slightly above-average quantity. Supply of the fast-moving grapes from Apulia are especially likely to increase.
Italy harvested a slightly above-average quantity. Supply of the fast-moving grapes from Apulia are especially likely to increase.

In Italy, the deadline for entries in the digital harvest register has been extended to 30 November 2022. Until the publication of the definitive figures in March 2023, the forecast presented by Unione Italiana Vini (UIV), Ismea and the oenologists' association Assoenologi in mid-September 2022 will apply. According to this, Italy is expected to produce 50.27 mill. hl of wine in 2022 despite the ‘drought of the century’ and record heat.

The figure is even slightly higher than the previous year's volume (50.23 mill. hl) and 3% above the average value of the last five years. The rain, which fell almost everywhere in August, certainly saved the bulk of the harvest. According to the surveys for the forecast, rain also fell in September, which benefited Montepulciano d'Abruzzo, Sangiovese and Nebbiolo in particular.

The vintage will nevertheless go down in history as the driest since 1800, and it was the hottest in 50 years. As a positive side effect of the heat and drought, there was hardly any fungal infestation to contend with. The quality of the grapes is rated good to optimal, especially for red wines. The alcohol content will be in the medium to high range. The acidity is slightly reduced for some white varieties.

Harvest in Italy 2022
Harvest in Italy 2022

With 11.5 mill. hl (-3%), Veneto accounts for more than 20% of Italy's total production. The regions of Veneto, Apulia (10.6 mill hl, +3%) and Emilia-Romagna (7.4 mill hl, +4%) account for 59% of production. While most regions hardly recorded any losses, the volume in Lombardy dropped by 20%, mainly due to the hailstorms at the beginning of July in Oltrepò-Pavese. Piedmont also lost a relatively high 9%. Sicily, contrary to the first estimate, expects not 5 but 10% losses.

Sardinia is expected to see the highest increase at 15%, followed by Tuscany at 12%. Trentino-Alto Adige, Valle d'Aosta, Umbria and Basilicata are each likely to have brought in 10% more grapes. (VC)

 

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