German fine wine increasingly popular

International trade in top German wine is flourishing.

Egon Müller's Scharzhofberger ranks amongst the most expensive wines from Germany / Credit: Sascha Speicher
Egon Müller's Scharzhofberger ranks amongst the most expensive wines from Germany / Credit: Sascha Speicher

 

Fine wine from Germany brings one thing to mind above all: Riesling. With its pronounced acid structure and – depending on the style – corresponding residual sugar values, the wines are extremely capable of maturing.

This is also rewarded in international trade: The London Fine Wine trading platform has evaluated that the number of German wines traded rose by 662 percent between 2017 and 2020. This means that Germany now accounts for 19 percent in terms of value in the “Rest of the World” category (wines from regions except Bordeaux, Burgundy, Rhone, Champagne and Italy), 2.7 percent more than last year (16.3%) and 16.8 percent more than in 2019 (2.2%).

In first place of the most traded German wines is Klaus-Peter Keller from Rheinhessen (first place since 2002), followed by the Egon Müller winery, Mosel. Seven of the ten most traded German wines in terms of value come from Egon Müller.

 

 

 

The top 10 is clearly dominated by the Mosel, but also a winery from the Palatinate, Reichsrat von Buhl, as well as two Rheingau producers, Schloss Johannisberg and Robert Weil.

The demand for top German wines is primarily generated in the USA (70% of the German wines traded on Liv-Ex). The easier trading conditions due to the abolition of US punitive tariffs have favored trade this year. Great Britain ranks second (26%), while Asia ranks third (4%).

Source: Liv-Ex

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